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Why Law School?

  • The skills learned in law school benefit anyone looking to develop as a leader in their field, from business professionals and government officials to journalists, nonprofit organizers, and beyond.
  • There is almost no undergraduate background that won’t translate well to law school, as long as you have the core skills of reading comprehension, critical thinking, and analytical reasoning. Some classes have had students from as many as 100 different undergraduate majors, everything from communications and English majors, to biology, math, and music majors.
  • Lawyers are the people responsible for the life, liberty, and property of others. If you’re someone who is interested in that type of work, then law school is for you.

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Anyone who aspires to leadership in any realm of life would benefit from a legal education.

Business leaders, government officials, journalists, there are plenty of people who the skills that are learned in law school would be incredibly useful for.

If you want to really learn how to think about an issue from different sides, think about the race issues in our society. Why do they persist? How could we overcome them? Law school is a place for people who want to do that kind of thinking. And I think finally, it's a place for people who like to solve problems.

We may be solving the problem of a college student who has created a new app and wants to protect that intellectual property. It could be a large corporation that's moving to a foreign country and needs to understand the employment laws there. Or it could be a nonprofit that wants to know how can we better help victims of domestic violence? In all those ways, whether it's solving the problem for an individual, for a company, or for society as a whole, that's what lawyers do.

I like to say that lawyers are the people who are responsible for the life, liberty, and property of others. And so if you're someone who is sort of interested in that type of responsibility, then law school is certainly for you. We've had classes where we've had 100 different majors-- everything from communications and English majors, to biology, to chemistry, to math, to music instruction. There's almost no undergraduate background that you could have that wouldn't translate well to law school, as long as you have the core skills of reading comprehension, critical thinking, and analytical reasoning.

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